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MATURE MARKET HEADLINES POSTED 06/23/97


To Move, or Not to Move ... away from your hamlet

That's a big decision for many retirees who often feel obliged to "get outta town" after retirement. That often means relocating to that annual vacation spot. Surprisingly though, the greater majority of retirees stay put. What's right for you? Well, help's on the way.

Just when you thought the world was safe again from all those "Dummy" books because the publishers couldn't possibly find another angle ... well, here comes "House Selling for Dummies". Believe it or not, this is another good one, especially for pre-retirees who might be a little too compulsive about moving.

The best thing about this book is that it doesn't recommend anything. Instead, it helps you in a far greater way. It helps you think through the relocation decision. For example, think about it. Boomers who are behind in saving for retirement may be ill-advised to trade-up on a new house.

On the other hand, retirees on a "fixed income" may not want to remain in an expensive area. They may want to trade-down to ease the pressures of inflation and home maintenance. To move, or not to move? The person who can best answer that question ... is you.

And the more you think about that question, the more intelligent your decision will be. So pick up a copy, give it a read, and then think critically about the relocation decision. "House Selling for Dummies?" Who knows, you might catch yourself mumbling, "Sure, it's a lame title, but it managed to ... move me".
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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Boomers: Sunglasses Now or Cataracts Later

People in their 40's who don't wear sunglasses regularly have a compelling reason to start: the earlier in life people protect their eyes from the sun, the less chance they have of developing sight-robbing cataracts.

Research shows that exposure to the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation over the years can speed the development of cataracts, promote development of cancer on the eyelid and the skin around the eyes and cause retinal problems that can lead to macular degeneration, says David A. Cockrell, O.D., Stillwater, Oklahoma. Dr. Cockrell is the chair of the American Optometric Association's (AOA) Primary Care and Patient Management Committee.

Choose sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of UV radiation (both UV-A and UV-B), screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light, and have lenses that are perfectly matched in color. Cockrell recommends consumers look for tags that carry the AOA Seal of Acceptance for non-prescription sunglasses. Source: AOA.
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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Elders and Tinnitus

Tinnitus is that ringing in the ears, most often heard by those over the age of 60. According to the Royal National Institute for Deaf People (London, England), tinnitus is the second most commonly reported ear problem, after hearing loss.

The problem tends to increase with age, says the American Tinnitus Association (ATA), which suggests that tinnitus affects 21 percent of the 50-79 year age group, and 20-42 percent of those 70 years and older. More importantly, tinnitus is not an isolated problem. It is often associated with diminished self-esteem, reduced motivation, stress, and depression.

The latter problems lead to a further down-hill spiral for the elder. Pfizer Pharmaceutical is now sponsoring research to identify a specific drug that will relieve tinnitus. Hopefully, says ATA, the new research will bring us closer to a pharmaceutical treatment for tinnitus.
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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10% of Grandparents Don't Visit Grandkids ... they raise them full time

She is just under 60 years old and she is coping with feeding bottles, diaper changes, midnight tantrums, and whatever else it takes to raise a grandchild. Welcome to the 90's in the United States. There has been a 44 percent increase in the number of children living with grandparents according to the 1990 census.

A study reported in the June 1997 issue of "The Gerontologist" found that custodial grandparenting cuts across class, race, and gender lines. The typical grandparent taking care of a grandchild is a woman and 62 percent are non-Hispanic White, and 27 percent are African-American. 74 percent live in urban areas and 57 percent of caregivers have completed highschool. 72 percent began caregiving before the child turned five.

The average age of custodial grandparents is 59 years. Astonishingly, 25 percent of the custodial grandparents live below the poverty level. Source: The Gerontological Society of America.
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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Estrogen Versus Alzheimer's

Recent studies by the National Institute on Aging suggest that a variety of safe and commonly used substances may protect against Alzheimer's Disease. Two of these are Vitamin E and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen.

Now, research suggests a third element, estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) may reduce Alzheimer's risk by 50 percent. In addition, the new "designer" estrogen that is under development by a variety of pharmaceutical companies, could minimize estrogen's "feminizing" side effects, providing a potent strategy for both men and women in delaying or reducing death due to Alzheimer's.
Source: National Institutes of Health.
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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Understanding Diabetes

Sixteen million Americans suffer from chronic disability and premature death due to diabetes, or Insulin Resistance. This is a disorder that impairs the ability to produce or manage insulin, a hormone essential for life. The three most common types of diabetes are: Type I, Type II, and Gestational.

Type I is also known as juvenile onset or insulin-dependent diabetes.
Type II is also known as adult onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes, which occurs in those over age 45 and overweight.
Gestational Diabetes occurs during two to five percent of all pregnancies and usually disappears afterwards, only to reappear later as Type II diabetes.

Insulin resistance is believed to result from both genetic (inherited) and environmental (lifestyle) factors such as obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and smoking. There goes that lifestyle factor again. The good news is the a degree of prevention and reduced risk is within our control. The bad news is that many Americans still don't get the message.

The total cost of diabetes, which is the sixth leading cause of death by disease in the U.S., is $92 billion in disability, work loss, premature death, and medical costs. For more information on diabetes, contact the American Diabetes Association at: 1-800-DIABETES.
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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Elder Horticulturalists Do It Down at the Plant

A mountain of research just turned into a avalanche of useful information that just might extend our enjoyment of life in the later years. Horticultural Therapists believe that mature adults can facilitate successful aging through the application of people-plant relationships.

And all the "how to" information is ready and waiting in "Horticultural Therapy and the Older Adult Population" (Haworth Press, May 1997, Suzanne E. Wells, Ed.). This is a 210 page, guidebook explaining how garden design enhances wellness, how horticultural therapy programs are easily planned and executed, and how new research supports the value of gardening.

Professionals in eldercare facilities will appreciate the wealth of program planning resource material reviewed in the book's bibliography. $39.95. Haworth Press, New York, 1-800-429-6784.
AgeVenture News Service, www.demko.com
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